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Cheers to FDA, Jeers to Trans Fats- Wednesday, November 27, 2013

By Bryan Bradford, Chief Nutrition Officer of Sunflower Shoppe Natural Foods

November 27, 2013

There is reason to applaud the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) based on the recent news on trans fats. In fact, it has begun the process of banning all trans fats from our food supply - and that’s worth a standing ovation!

On November 7, the FDA announced that it has made a preliminary determination that partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs), the primary dietary source of artificial trans fat in processed foods, are not “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) for use in food. It has found that trans fats may be responsible for up to 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths each year! No amount of trans fats are safe to eat. Our labels may state: “Trans Fat - 0” but if there are any partially hydrogenated oils listed in the ingredients list you are consuming trans fats!

While trans fats have been in our food supply since before Sunflower Shoppe opened its doors 43 years ago, we have always maintained that this ingredient has been an unhealthy choice and have done our part to educate our customers and offer healthier alternatives.

Please visit the links below for more information about trans fats - what they are and how you can recognize them on food labels, such as pastries, frostings, margarines and some frozen foods. Pay particular attention to the foods you eat at restaurants. It’s true that some companies have stopped using trans fats, but it is always wise to ask if in doubt! The process of actually phasing out all trans fats could take years. Be sure to protect yourself and your family in the meantime.

For more information about this or other health topics, come visit us at Sunflower Shoppe - where great health is just a way of life!

http://www.fda.gov/Food/PopularTopics/ucm373922.htm
http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/07/health/fda-trans-fats/
http://blog.doctoroz.com/dr-oz-blog/fda-proposes-to-eliminate-trans-fats


The content and opinions expressed in this “Shoppe Talk” blog are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any illness or to provide medical advice. We are not medical doctors and we do not prescribe medication. If you have any questions about the relationship between nutrition and supplements, we recommend that you seek the advice of a qualified and licensed health practitioner. Our opinions are based on the literature and data from a variety of medical doctors, chiropractors, naturopathic physicians, biochemists and other professional researchers. You are encouraged to make your health care decisions based on your own research and the advice of a qualified health care professional.

Tags :  trans fatfdabannutritionhealth
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The Scoop on Statins- Friday, November 22, 2013

Why the new guidelines on heart attack and stroke are giving us a heart attack

By Bryan Bradford, Chief Nutrition Officer of Sunflower Shoppe Natural Foods

November 22, 2013

You may have heard the buzz recently about the new guidelines doctors are to use when determining a patient's need for statin medication to lower the risk for heart attack and stroke. According to the Associated Press, one third of U.S. adults ages 40 to 70 will meet the threshold to consider taking a statin drug. Only 15% of this group currently takes a statin drug(s). Under these guidelines, it is more likely that your doctor may suggest long term statin therapy for you.

There is much debate about this issue going on in the medical world. The heart experts who wrote the new guidelines are having to defend the formula that some doctors say overestimate the risk for certain groups.

There are pros and cons to consider when it comes to statins, and we would like to help you make an educated decision if you find yourself considering statin therapy.

First, let me explain that the body produces cholesterol because it needs it. LDL has been labeled the “bad” guy because of extra LDL molecules that remain after the good LDL work has been done. This very important work includes building healthy cells, repairing injury, and helping our body make the hormones it needs. Afterwards, in comes HDL (the “good” cholesterol) whose job is to “mop” up those LDL molecules not being used and return them to the liver. It’s only when we don’t have enough HDL to clean up LDLs that we are at greater risk for heart disease and stroke.

Before considering long term medications, it is important to know that you can help control many of the risk factors for heart disease. Diet and exercise are your first line of defense since imbalanced blood sugar levels are a major cause of unhealthy ratios of LDL and HDL. And we all know smoking and stress are leading contributors of heart disease. However, if these lifestyle changes are not enough to reduce your risk of heart disease according to your doctor, then you should know the risk factors of the drugs themselves.

These serious side effects include the following, according to LIPITOR® (atorvastatin calcium), as listed on its label. All statins have similar warnings:

  • Muscle problems. LIPITOR®can cause muscle problems such as weakness, tenderness or pain that may occur without a good reason, especially if you also have a fever or feel more tired than usual. This may be an early sign of a rare muscle problem.

  • Liver problems. Your doctor should do blood tests to check your liver before you start taking LIPITOR and if you have symptoms of liver problems while you take LIPITOR. Call your doctor right away if you have the following symptoms of liver problems:

                         feel tired or weak

                         loss of appetite

                         upper belly pain

There was enough evidence from clinical trials and reports of adverse effects from patients, doctors and drug makers that in 2012 the Food and Drug Administration  required manufacturers of statin drugs to add new safety warnings to reflect an increased risk of memory loss and diabetes.

The diabetes risk is especially concerning since one of the key target groups for statin drugs is now “people ages 40 to 75 with Type 2 Diabetes."

Some statin drugs may impair memory - researchers at the University of Bristol in England found that two commonly prescribed statins - pravastatin (Pravachol) and atorvostatin (Lipitor) - reduced performance of recognition and working memory in an animal experiment.

Statins may raise cataract risk - a research team at the San Antonio Military Medical Center, Texas, reported in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology (September 2013 issue) that statin usage increased the risk of cataracts by 27%.

Statins work by blocking the enzyme HGM - CoA reductase which is the pathway the body uses to create cholesterol and CoQ10. The Mayo Clinic provides this information on its website regarding CoQ10 (Coenzyme Q10). CoQ10 is produced by the human body and is necessary for the basic functioning of cells. CoQ10 levels are reported to decrease with age and to be low in patients with some chronic diseases such as heart conditions, muscular dystrophies, Parkinson's disease, cancer, diabetes and HIV/AIDS. Some prescription drugs may also lower CoQ10 levels.

If you are taking a statin, supplementing with CoQ10 is critical, and most but not all doctors have begun to recommend it.

Many doctors and researchers believe that the benefits of these medications far outweigh the potential risks. Your decision whether or not to continue or begin statin therapy is one you should make with your doctor. Hopefully, you are now equipped with information - and the whole picture - to help you make the best decision. If you would like to learn more about heart health and other wellness topics, come see us at Sunflower Shoppe where great health is just a way of life!

Helpful links and references:

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/10/02/statins-weighing-risks-and-benefits/

http://ubiquinol.org/blog/how-use-statins-can-affect-your-coenzyme-q10-levels#.Uo1h4ZRga9M

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266632.php

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266445.php-

http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1108676


The content and opinions expressed in this “Shoppe Talk” blog are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any illness or to provide medical advice. We are not medical doctors and we do not prescribe medication. If you have any questions about the relationship between nutrition and supplements, we recommend that you seek the advice of a qualified and licensed health practitioner. Our opinions are based on the literature and data from a variety of medical doctors, chiropractors, naturopathic physicians, biochemists and other professional researchers. You are encouraged to make your health care decisions based on your own research and the advice of a qualified health care professional.

Tags :  statinsrisksheart attackstrokehealth
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For weight problems to energy slumps, go 'round the mulberry bush'- Sunday, November 10, 2013

By Bryan Bradford, Chief Nutrition Officer of Sunflower Shoppe Natural Foods

November 8, 2013

Feeling sluggish in the afternoon? Suffering from headaches or having trouble concentrating?

Are you struggling to maintain your ideal weight? These could be signs your blood sugar levels are imbalanced.

There have been several reports recently about the positive effects of mulberries (specifically mulberry leaf extract) on blood sugar levels. This Turkish superfruit has been around for a very long time along with studies that support its health benefits.

Research shows mulberry has the ability to inhibit the activity of an enzyme involved in carbohydrate digestion and to significantly reduce the rise of blood sugar levels after a meal. Human clinical trials have been published in the Journals of the American Diabetes Association, the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry and the Journal of Functional Foods. Although there are many other health benefits to be gained by incorporating the tasty white mulberries into your diet, modulating blood sugar levels is most definitely at the top!

Having consistently high levels of glucose in the blood leads to a greater need for insulin. If there is a constant and long-term demand on the pancreas to produce insulin, eventually it may no longer be able to produce enough on its own. This can lead to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes which can put you at a higher risk of heart disease, stroke and neuropathy. Maintaining a diet that includes fruits, vegetables, lean meats and healthy fats while reducing sugar intake and increasing exercise is the best way to help prevent Type 2 Diabetes and control it if you have already been diagnosed.

Add some whole dried white mulberries, mulberry leaf extract capsules or white mulberry tea to your program and enjoy the health benefits of this superfruit today!


The content and opinions expressed in this “Shoppe Talk” blog are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any illness or to provide medical advice. We are not medical doctors and we do not prescribe medication. If you have any questions about the relationship between nutrition and supplements, we recommend that you seek the advice of a qualified and licensed health practitioner. Our opinions are based on the literature and data from a variety of medical doctors, chiropractors, naturopathic physicians, biochemists and other professional researchers. You are encouraged to make your health care decisions based on your own research and the advice of a qualified health care professional.

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New study suggests safe alternative to antidepressant drugs- Thursday, November 07, 2013

By Bryan Bradford, Chief Nutrition Officer of Sunflower Shoppe Natural Foods

October 18, 2013

Fox News.com recently released news that suggests a curcumin as a safe alternative to antidepressant drugs. The recent research from Baylor University Medical Center is focusing on the effects of curcumin on patients with depression and shows some very positive results. People with depression have been shown to have an increase in inflammation in the brain and they make fewer brain cells (neurogenesis). This study showed a decrease in inflammation in the brain as well as an increase in levels of neurogenesis (an increase in brain cells).

Curcumin is one of the main active compounds found in the spice turmeric which is derived from the root of the plant Curcuma longa, a member of the ginger family. While curcumin is the focus of most medical research, it is not the only beneficial compound in turmeric. Adding this whole spice in your diet will help ensure you are getting all the antioxidant benefits.

The BCM-95 that was used in this study is special because it includes all three curcuminoids as well as seven turmeric essential oils which increase the absorption of the beneficial compounds.

For more information about this or any other wellness questions you may have, come see us at Sunflower Shoppe - where great health is just a way of life!

Watch the Fox News segment, "Safe Alternative to Antidepressants"

Video published October 09, 2013 FoxNews.com


The content and opinions expressed in this “Shoppe Talk” blog are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any illness or to provide medical advice. We are not medical doctors and we do not prescribe medication. If you have any questions about the relationship between nutrition and supplements, we recommend that you seek the advice of a qualified and licensed health practitioner. Our opinions are based on the literature and data from a variety of medical doctors, chiropractors, naturopathic physicians, biochemists and other professional researchers. You are encouraged to make your health care decisions based on your own research and the advice of a qualified health care professional.

Tags :  safe antidepressantscurcuminstudyhealth
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